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Moving Toward Better Health

The official blog of Konicki Schumacher Chiropractic

02
Jan
0

Outer Knee Pain

Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
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in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

Question: The outside of my knee hurts when I exercise. This happens when I run or ride my bike. Often my hip hurts as well. What could this be?

Answer: There is a good chance you have iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS).

02
Jan
0

Rotater Cuff Injuries

Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
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in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

Question: I recently started having shoulder pain for no apparent reason. My doctor told me that I have rotator cuff tendonitis. How did I get that and what can I do about it?

Answer: Most shoulder problems involve the rotator cuff muscles and tendons. The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and their tendons that holds your shoulder joint in the proper place.

02
Jan
0

Serious Back Pain

Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
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in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

Question: My back hurts at times for no reason. When do I need to worry about a more serious problem?

Answer: Back pain is an extremely common problem. Eighty percent of you will experience low back pain at some point in your life.

02
Jan
0

Short Leg Causes Pain

Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
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in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

Question: I went to a chiropractor and he told me I have a short leg. Don't most people have one leg shorter? Could this be causing my hip pain?

Answer: A short leg absolutely can cause hip pain. And yes, having one leg shorter than the other is very common. However, common does not mean that it is normal.

27
Feb
0
Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
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in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

dizzy 425px

Do you get sudden dizziness or vertigo when you move your head? You may be suffering from Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV).

Typical symptoms include vertigo, which is a sense of rotation, when lying down or rolling over in bed. Getting out of bed or tipping your head back to look up can cause a wave of dizziness. You may also feel lightheaded, off-balance or nauseous.

Tags: dizziness
02
Jan
0

Tennis Elbow Without Tennis

Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
User is currently offline
in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

Question: My doctor told me that I have tennis elbow. I am confused. I have never played tennis. What do I have and how did I get this?

Answer: Tennis elbow is the common name for the formal diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis. The lateral epicondyle is an area on the outer portion of your elbow where forearm muscles attach.

This is a form of tendonitis. The extensor muscles cause your wrist and hand to extend backward. The backhand stroke in tennis creates traumatic exertion on these muscles so that your wrist does not collapse when you hit the ball. Hence, the name tennis elbow.

Many types of repetitive activities can cause tennis elbow. This may include repetitive gripping, painting, using a screw driver or hammer--any movement requiring repetitive twisting.

Tennis elbow can be very painful and even debilitating. I have seen patients holding their elbow simply to avoid any movement because it has become so inflamed.

The inflammation comes from partial, small tears in the tendons that attach muscles to the bones of your elbow. This in turn inflames the bone itself and the pain can become rather excruciating. It tends to become chronic unless treated effectively.

A common problem is loss of grip strength. People often drop items when lifting something up with the palm facing downward. Additionally, pain can radiate from your elbow down toward your hand.

Treatment consists of reducing inflammation at the elbow. In our office, we use pulsed ultrasound and electrical muscle stimulation in addition to ice at home. Medical doctors may prescribe anti-inflammatory medication.

We apply cross-friction massage to the tight muscles and tendons. This helps to break up any unnecessary adhesions, loosening the muscle. Once it has relaxed, it helps to quit tugging on the damaged tissues.

In extreme cases, the elbow may need to be braced and immobilized for a short period to allow it to calm down. A tennis elbow strap is also helpful and effective, especially if you must continue using the elbow when inflamed.

Once the pain has reduced, specific stretches and strengthening exercises are indicated. Otherwise, it will simply return as soon as you go back to your old ways.

If you have elbow pain that won't go away with ice or exercise, see your chiropractor. He or she is trained to evaluate and treat this condition properly.



Copyright © 2008 - Konicki Schumacher Chiropractic. All rights reserved.

Dr. Tom Konicki is a board certified chiropractic orthopedist and has practiced for many years in South Dayton. You can reach him at www.kschiro.com or mail your questions to Ask the Chiropractor, 2165 Miamisburg-Centerville Road, Dayton, Ohio 45459.

02
Jan
0

The Bottom of My Feet Hurt

Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
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in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

Question: The bottom of my feet and heels hurt, especially in the morning. This gradually improves as I walk, only to return the next day. What is this?

Answer: You are probably suffering from plantar fasciitis. This is inflammation of a flat band of tissue connecting the heel of the foot to the toes.

02
Jan
0

TMJ pain

Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
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in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

Question: My jaw pops, clicks and can be difficult to open my mouth wide. I was told I possibly have TMJ. Can a chiropractor help me?

Answer: Yes, you are having TMJ pain, which is more accurately known as TMD (temporal mandibular joint disorder). Doctors of chiropractic can be an integral part of your health care team in managing these chronic problems.

The temporal mandibular joint (TMJ) is the joint near your ear between your jaw and your skull. There is a small disc that sits between the joint which cushions the bones during opening and closing of the mouth. When you open, your jaw rotates forward, sliding the disc forward and downward.

If the ligaments that hold the disc are injured, the disc can slip out of place and be pulled too far forward. Mild displacement causes clicking or popping and can be painful. Sometimes, the disc gets trapped forward and you are unable to close your jaw.

Several things can cause TMD. You may have problems with your teeth, such as clenching and grinding, especially at night. If you are missing a tooth, your teeth tend to shift to try to help fill the space, which may change your bite. If your teeth do not match up correctly (malocclusion), this will cause stress on the TMJ.

Another significant cause is muscle pain. The muscles of the jaw are extremely strong and if they become too tight, they can cause excess pressure on the joint. These muscles may become spastic due to trauma, such as being hit in the jaw. Whiplash of the neck is also a common way to injure the jaw.

Postural problems in the neck and upper back can put stress on the TMJ. Chiropractors are in a unique position to treat both your neck and jaw, managing your pain more effectively.

Lastly, degenerative joint disease may wear out the joint and possibly require surgery. However, most agree this should be the very last resort.

Typical symptoms of TMD are popping, clicking or pain about the jaw near your ear. You may have limited movement or locking of the jaw.

Headaches are extremely common. Earaches, dizziness and neck pain are common as well.

Our chiropractic treatment consists of evaluating how your jaw opens and closes as well as finding muscles that are too tight. We perform myofascial release of these muscles, which involves deep and specific massage to release the tension. Sometimes, we perform gentle manipulation to the joint to help with the movement.

If your TMJ is flared-up, use ice to calm it down. Later on, heat can be used to help relax muscles.

We recommend not using the jaw excessively, such as chewing gum or hard candy. Even eating a big apple may cause a problem. You will be given stretching exercises to help keep your jaw relaxed.

Sometimes it is necessary to coordinate your care with a dentist to make sure your bite is correct. He or she may prescribe a splint or appliance to help control TMD.

Unfortunately, TMD can be an ongoing condition and needs to be managed. Doctors of chiropractic can help you do this in a safe, effective manner without the use of drugs or surgery.



Copyright © 2008 - Konicki Schumacher Chiropractic. All rights reserved.

Dr. Tom Konicki is a board certified chiropractic orthopedist and has practiced for many years in South Dayton. You can reach him at www.kschiro.com or mail your questions to Ask the Chiropractor, 2165 Miamisburg-Centerville Road, Dayton, Ohio 45459.

02
Jan
0

Twisted Knee Causes Pain

Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
User is currently offline
in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

Question: I fell, twisting my right knee several weeks ago. The inner side of my knee continues to hurt. What might have happened and what can I do about it?

Answer: Knees are easily injured in a fall. When you break a stick, it breaks in the middle, not at the end. The same analogy applies to the knee. The knee tends to be the "middle of the stick that breaks".

Ligaments provide support for your knees. This includes the medial collateral ligament (MCL), lateral collateral ligament (LCL), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Lastly, the patellar ligament attaches your knee cap to your tibia (shin bone).

If you continue to have pain along the inner aspect of your knee, you may have injured your medial collateral ligament. This connects the femur to the tibia and limits bending your knee inward.

When you sprain this ligament, you tear ligament fibers. It is the same as spraining your ankle when you tear the ligaments and have swelling.

Sprains are rated according to severity. Grade I is mild with micro tears and these typically can be treated at home.

Grade II sprains are moderate tears and these probably hurt enough to make you seek help. You can have significant swelling and limitations in your ability to walk.

Grade III sprains are severe and with complete rupture of the ligament. You need to see an orthopedic surgeon to determine if this is surgical or not.

The good news is most MCL injuries fall into grade I or II and do not require surgery. These can be treated conservatively with your chiropractor or physical therapist.

The proper examination determines the location of your pain. X-rays can give information, but this is limited for MCL injuries. An MRI is the best test to determine the extent of damage.

The next step is to reduce inflammation which certainly includes ice treatments at home. We apply ultrasound and electrical stimulation to accomplish this. Your family doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatory medication.

Bracing and crutches may be necessary, again based on severity of injury. This allows the ligament injury to form scar tissue and heal much like a cut on your skin. It can take 6 weeks for this scar tissue to form adequately.

We apply cross-friction massage to the MCL as it heals. This helps to reduce excess scar tissue, which can cause pain and limited movement. This is very effective in reducing ongoing pain.

We work to improve your motion and lastly improve your strength. Strong muscles help protect your ligament, there by reducing the risk of future re-injury.

If you do not improve as expected, an MRI is indicated. Another common injury to occur on the inner side of your knee is a meniscus tear.

An MRI will look at both MCL and meniscus.

In summary, use ice and rest if you twist or bend your knee inward. If you have significant pain or your pain persists, see your chiropractor for proper evaluation and treatment.

Copyright © 2008 - Konicki Schumacher Chiropractic. All rights reserved.

Dr. Tom Konicki is a board certified chiropractic orthopedist and has practiced for many years in South Dayton. You can reach him at www.kschiro.com or mail your questions to Ask the Chiropractor, 2165 Miamisburg-Centerville Road, Dayton, Ohio 45459.

02
Jan
0

What is a Back Sprain?

Posted by Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Tom Konicki
Dr. Thomas Konicki earned his B.S. in Biology at the University of Cincinnati and then went on to the Los Ange...
User is currently offline
in Orthopedic Conditions/Injuries

Question: I have known people with a sprained ankle who are laid up for days. But I had a sprain and strain to my low back and was still able to move around and work. What exactly does it mean when you sprain your back and shouldn't it be more debilitating than a sprained ankle?

Answer: Let me first explain what a sprain and strain injury is. A sprain is tearing of ligaments and a strain is tearing of muscles. Many of us have "pulled a muscle" and the soreness goes away in a few days. Your quick recovery indicates that you simply had some small micro tears of the muscle fibers and you healed quickly. The same is true of a mild ankle sprain, which may heal on its own within one or two weeks.